The future management of waste and recycling in Launceston

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The Launceston City Counci would like to thank the community for contributing its thoughts and comments during our community consultation on the future management of waste and recycling in Launceston.
 
Read the consultation summary  and the survey statistics to see how the community responded.
 
You can see from 10 December 2012 Meeting of Council, Aldermen voted unanimously (11:0) 'to consider the outcomes from the community consultation and to adopt the Launceston Resource Recover and Waste Management Interium Strategy Action Plan and proposed initiatives to implement the actions in this plan.'

Waste and Recycling

The Launceston City Council

The Launceston City Counci would like to thank the community for contributing its thoughts and comments during our community consultation on the future management of waste and recycling in Launceston.
 
Read the consultation summary  and the survey statistics to see how the community responded.
 
You can see from 10 December 2012 Meeting of Council, Aldermen voted unanimously (11:0) 'to consider the outcomes from the community consultation and to adopt the Launceston Resource Recover and Waste Management Interium Strategy Action Plan and proposed initiatives to implement the actions in this plan.'

Waste and Recycling

The Launceston City Council is seeking your feedback on the best ways to recover recyclables from waste generated by the community. A one page introduction to the project tells you of Council's commitment to the future management of waste and recycling, the work carried out to date and how we plan to improve current recycling rates. 

A report from Blue Environment, a consultancy firm commissioned by Council to investigate the feasibility of achieving 90% diversion from landfill with an emphasis on local jobs, local business and industry growth and the environment, has been completed. In response to this report, the Launceston City Council has prepared an interim strategy and action plan (ISAP), proposing five actions to improve resource recovery.  

We invite your input into this interim strategy. You're invited to:

.     take a few minutes to complete the quick poll
.     take a few minutes to complete the quick surveys
.     read the one page information sheets on each of the five actions 
.     download related documents
.     add your comments and ideas to each of the discussion topics
.     come along to one of our information sessions
 

This is your city, your future. Take this opportunity and have your say in its future! 

Discussions: All (5) Open (5)
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    Disposing waste to landfill incurs long term financial costs. For example, it is not just the day to day landfill operational cost that must be paid for (employee salaries, machinery use, petrol). Council also has to raise funds to pay for upgrades to the landfill and landfill extensions. Who should pay for these upgrades? How should we pay for these upgrades?

    Raising sufficient funds today is important so that future users of the landfill are not left with an unfair bill to manage the waste we dispose today.

    Should we each pay a proportion towards future environmental...

     

     


    Disposing waste to landfill incurs long term financial costs. For example, it is not just the day to day landfill operational cost that must be paid for (employee salaries, machinery use, petrol). Council also has to raise funds to pay for upgrades to the landfill and landfill extensions. Who should pay for these upgrades? How should we pay for these upgrades?

    Raising sufficient funds today is important so that future users of the landfill are not left with an unfair bill to manage the waste we dispose today.

    Should we each pay a proportion towards future environmental management and carbon costs of the waste we dispose today? 

    This one page summary  gives an overview to understanding lifestyle costs.

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    Organic waste in landfill causes significant environmental harm and risk. When organic materials, such as food and garden waste, are disposed to landfill, they decompose and generate methane, a greenhouse gas with 20 times more potency than carbon dioxide. These decomposing organics create a carbon liability for council and its rate payers now and into the future. Yet it doesn't have to be this way.

    Organic materials are a valuable resource. When composted, they can be used to improve soils which leads to healthier plants and gardens. While Council has a gas capture system in place for...

     

     

     


    Organic waste in landfill causes significant environmental harm and risk. When organic materials, such as food and garden waste, are disposed to landfill, they decompose and generate methane, a greenhouse gas with 20 times more potency than carbon dioxide. These decomposing organics create a carbon liability for council and its rate payers now and into the future. Yet it doesn't have to be this way.

    Organic materials are a valuable resource. When composted, they can be used to improve soils which leads to healthier plants and gardens. While Council has a gas capture system in place for methane generated, at best, only half to two thirds of methane can be feasibly captured. Further, organics in landfill represents a lost resource.  

    Thinking about Council's landfill gas capture system and that organic materials emit methane when landfilled, should council continue to landfill all organic materials (i.e. food, garden organics, timber)?

    Would you be interested in having a weekly/fortnightly garden and food organics household kerbside collection service? Read this preliminary business case for the introduction of kerbside organics.

    This one page summary gives an overview on the five main drivers to divert organic waste from the landfill and the benefits.

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  • Resource recovery (improved resource recovery) - Have you considered the ways we can increase our resource recovery?

    almost 8 years ago
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    A recent audit of the Launceston landfill and transfer station (APC 2011) indicated almost 60% of what is currently sent to landfill could be recovered for reuse and recycling. Sending waste to landfill causes environmental harm, but it also requires less staff than if we were to recover resources. The federal government, in its National Waste Report 2010, suggests nine jobs are created whenever we divert 10,000 tonnes of materials from the landfill. In addition to composting, there are a range of ways we can increase our resource recovery. These options include establishing a...

     

     

     

     


    A recent audit of the Launceston landfill and transfer station (APC 2011) indicated almost 60% of what is currently sent to landfill could be recovered for reuse and recycling. Sending waste to landfill causes environmental harm, but it also requires less staff than if we were to recover resources. The federal government, in its National Waste Report 2010, suggests nine jobs are created whenever we divert 10,000 tonnes of materials from the landfill. In addition to composting, there are a range of ways we can increase our resource recovery. These options include establishing a resale shop and recovering materials from mixed loads of waste that are brought into the Launceston Waste Centre. Page 49 of the Blue Environment report talks about tip shop opportunities.

    The one page summary  gives an overview on the reasons for improving resource recovery at Launceston Waste Centre (LWC).  If council spent more on recycling services and infrastructure but this resulted in local job creation, would  you support additional expenditure on recycling?

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  • The team - Should Council invest more resources to achieve better recycling?

    almost 8 years ago
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    Achieving better recycling requires more people to facilitate recycling services and infrastructure. Council has committed to employing two people to assist Launceston improve its recycling but also assist the northern region's councils to work together to achieve better waste management and recycling.

    Of all materials to the Launceston landfill, 90% currently goes to landfill. In the rest of Australia, 48% of all waste generated is sent to landfill.

    This one page summary gives an overview on improved resourcing.

     

     

     


    Achieving better recycling requires more people to facilitate recycling services and infrastructure. Council has committed to employing two people to assist Launceston improve its recycling but also assist the northern region's councils to work together to achieve better waste management and recycling.

    Of all materials to the Launceston landfill, 90% currently goes to landfill. In the rest of Australia, 48% of all waste generated is sent to landfill.

    This one page summary gives an overview on improved resourcing.

     

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  • The future - Developing a long term strategy

    almost 8 years ago
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    The ISAP is a one year strategy to help Launceston City Council improve waste management. Outcomes from some of the work we will do over the coming year, such as from the resource recovery trials, will help shape what kinds of activities we need to pursue in the future to improve our recycling. Once these activities have been implemented, a long term strategy for waste management and recycling will be prepared. Such a strategy will ensure proper resources, services and infrastructure are planned, enabling the community to recover valuable resources for the benefit of current and future generations.

    Is...

     

     


    The ISAP is a one year strategy to help Launceston City Council improve waste management. Outcomes from some of the work we will do over the coming year, such as from the resource recovery trials, will help shape what kinds of activities we need to pursue in the future to improve our recycling. Once these activities have been implemented, a long term strategy for waste management and recycling will be prepared. Such a strategy will ensure proper resources, services and infrastructure are planned, enabling the community to recover valuable resources for the benefit of current and future generations.

    Is it important for Council to have a long term strategy for how it manages the community's waste?
    Do you care about how your waste and recycling is managed?

    This one page summary gives an overview to the development of a long term strategy.

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